Engineering Science

Engineering Science University College OxfordAt Oxford, we believe that future engineering innovation will benefit from broad foundations as well as specialised knowledge, and so our undergraduate degree is based on a unified course in Engineering Science, which integrates study of the subject across the traditional boundaries of engineering disciplines. The first two years are devoted to topics which we believe all Engineering undergraduates should study. In the third and fourth years there is scope for specialisation into one of six branches of engineering: Biomedical, Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Information and Mechanical. The course is perfect for students who know they have a strong aptitude for solving scientific problems in creative ways, but want to broaden their knowledge and interests before committing themselves to specialise. The course is rigorous, and requires strong mathematical ability and so offers you the chance to gain the foundational knowledge you’ll need to be a successful engineer in an interesting and rewarding way.

At Univ, our tutors have a wide range of expertise and are committed to each student achieving their full potential. In-college tutorials provide fundamental teaching that complements the lecture and practical teaching provided by the Department. Univ typically admits a relatively large group of students for the subject, allowing for a supportive and dynamic community. Univ supports all of its students whose courses place a heavy emphasis on Maths, including Engineering, with an introductory Maths Week at the start of their first year. This is to ensure you are as prepared as possible to be successful in your studies.

There is a wealth of information about the Engineering course structure, possible option choices, and admissions criteria on the University of Oxford’s main website, available at ox.ac.uk

Any undergraduate degree at Oxford provides you with a wide variety of transferable skills and therefore Univ’s students progress to a diverse range of careers. For some, their undergraduate degree leads to academic research, industrial research or teaching. For many, their future career, for instance in business, government or the charitable sector, is defined less by the subject they studied and more by the skills they acquired. Oxford’s Careers Service provides destination statistics for graduates.

Resources

If you are considering applying for Engineering Science, a number of resources you might find useful to explore beyond the school curriculum can be found on Univ’s Staircase12 pages, including the Reading Bank and Resource Hub.

Univ tutor, Tom Povey, has written an excellent book packed with Physics and Maths problems to help you prepare to apply to a competitive university; Professor Povey’s Perplexing Problems (2015) is available from, amongst others, amazon.co.uk and Blackwells. Read our review here.

Cambridge University have an excellent resource to support students looking to apply for engineering at top universities, see: i-want-to-study-engineering.org

Note About Tutor Changes

Contact Univ

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