Computer Science

Computer Science University College OxfordComputer Science is about learning and understanding the mathematical, scientific and engineering principles underlying every kind of computing system, from mobile phones and the internet via systems that interpret natural language, to the supercomputers that forecast tomorrow’s weather or simulate the effects of disease on the human heart. To be a successful Computer Science student, you will need a curiosity about how things work, and the ability to use mathematics to solve problems creatively. Our course starts with the fundamentals of computers and programming, so it is not necessary to have studied these subjects before coming to Oxford.

Univ was the first college in Oxford to appoint a Tutorial Fellow in Computer Science, and so we have a long-standing tradition of supporting cutting edge teaching and research in the subject. As a Computer Science student here you will be well-supported by an engaged team of tutors and you will study with a dynamic group of students. Though a theoretical degree in many senses, the course is also highly practical and we encourage you to explore how Computer Science interacts with the wider world. Univ supports all of its students whose courses place a heavy emphasis on Maths, including Computer Science, with an introductory Maths Week at the start of their first year. This is to ensure you are as prepared as possible to be successful in your studies. Univ also accepts students to study Computer Science alongside Maths or Philosophy, and tutors in those subjects are always pleased to work with students studying a joint school with Computer Science.

There is a wealth of information about the Computer Science course structure, possible option choices, and admissions criteria on the University of Oxford’s main website, available at ox.ac.uk

Any undergraduate degree at Oxford provides you with a wide variety of transferable skills and therefore Univ’s students progress to a diverse range of careers. For some, their undergraduate degree leads to academic research, industrial research or teaching. For many, their future career, for instance in business, government or the charitable sector, is defined less by the subject they studied and more by the skills they acquired. Oxford’s Careers Service provides destination statistics for graduates.

Resources

If you are considering applying for Computer Science, a number of resources you might find useful to explore beyond the school curriculum can be found on Univ’s Staircase12 website including book reviews and general resources.

Further excellent resources for prospective applicants can be found on Oxford’s Computer Science department website.

 

Note About Tutor Changes

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