Lisa Kallet

Lisa Kallet

George Cawkwell Tutorial Fellow in Ancient History; Associate Professor in Ancient History; Harassment Officer

Contact information

Lisa.Kallet@univ.ox.ac.uk

Teaching

I teach Greek and Roman Ancient History papers for Classics, Ancient and Modern History (AMH), and Classical Archaeology and Ancient History (CAAH).

Research

My areas of research specialty focus on Greek historiography (especially Thucydides), and Athens—its empire and democracy, and Athenian epigraphy. I am particularly interested in the relationship between democracy and empire and the ways in which the Athenians both conceptualized and organized the Aegean as their own possession. My current projects include a history of Athenian economic interests in the north Aegean and Thrace in the archaic and classical periods (ca. 600-300 B.C.), focusing on methods of exploitation and modes of negotiation between Athenians and Thracians, Macedonians and other Greeks in this resource-rich region; numeracy in Athens; and the economic unification of the Athenian empire.

Selected Publications

The Athenian Empire: Using Coins as Sources (Cambridge, forthcoming, with John Kroll)

Money and the Corrosion of Power in Thucydides: the Sicilian Expedition and its Aftermath (California, 2001)

Money, Expense and Naval Power in Thucydides’ History 1-5.24 (California 1993)

Naupaktos, Naupaktians, and Messenians in Naupaktos in the Peloponnesian War. In O. Palagia, ed. Naupaktos, the Ancient City in the Peloponnesian War and the Hellenistic Period (Athens 2016) 15-41

‘The Origins of the Athenian Economic Arche.’ Journal of Hellenic Studies 133 (2013) 143-60

‘Thucydides, Apollo, the Plague and the War.’ American Journal of Philology 134 (2013) 355-82

‘Democracy, Empire and Epigraphy in the 20th Century.’ In J. Ma, N. Papazarkadas and R. Parker, eds. Interpreting the Athenian Empire., (Duckworth 2009), 43-66.

‘Thucydides’ Workshop of History and Utility Outside the Text’ In A. Rengakos and A. Tsakmakis, eds., Brill Companion to Thucydides, (Brill 2006), 335-68.

‘Epigraphic Geography: the Tribute Quota Fragments Assigned to 421/0-415/4’ Hesperia 73, (2004), 465-96.

Demos Tyrannos: Wealth, Power and Economic Patronage’ In K. Morgan, ed., Popular Tyranny, (University of Texas Press 2003), 117-154.

Contact Univ

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